Program for Snap!Con 2022

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Devin Jean

Block-based languages like Snap! have become mainstay tools for introducing programming to students of all ages. The simple interface and restrictions on block connections allow users to easily find program behaviors they want to use and mitigate many of the types of syntax errors that would be possible and typical for new learners using textual languages. This strong foundation is ideal for...
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11:30 am - 11:50 am PST
Plenary

Jadga Hügle, Bernat Romagosa, Jens Mönig

Students deal with cryptography and security every day, e.g. by picking passwords for online accounts. We all know about basic cryptography from inventing secret languages with our friends. But how does cryptography actually work? How did Caesar get secret messages to his army? How can you send messages safely over the internet?

In this talk we want to share an outline on a new openS...
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12:00 pm - 12:20 pm PST
Room 1

Elaine Wolfe

In this talk, I will compare the different coding aspects of creating a one line drawing by Picasso and a Waclaw Szpakowski’s rhythmical line drawing in TurtleStitch.

To create a Picasso one line drawing, the image is added to the stage area by the Import command. This image becomes the background and is then traced point by point along the edge of the image. The tracing program is ...
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12:00 pm - 12:20 pm PST
Room 2

Glen Bull

Rachel Gibson, Glen Bull, Jo Watts - University of Virginia Online Talk

A drum track establishes the rhythm or beat for music. Many cultures are known for rhythms and drum patterns that are characteristic of their music. In this talk, patterns from several cultures include Latin America, Asia, Africa, and Europe will be explored. The format will consist of these elements:

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12:00 pm - 12:20 pm PST
Room 3

Miles Berry

The session begins by revisiting some of Papert's writing, including '20 Things to do with a Computer' (with Solomon) and Mindstorms. We'll look at how many of the insights from his work remain relevant today, particularly in relat...
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12:20 pm - 12:40 pm PST
Room 1

Margaret Low, Helen Luckhurst

Link to presentation in powerpoint

Stitch in Time Resources: www.warwick.ac.uk/stitchintime

Warwick TurtleStitch Resources (Primary Maths, Skills, Projects): view more

12:20 pm - 12:40 pm PST
Room 2

Jesus Villalobos

In close communication with Jens Moenig and Dariusz Dorożalski, developers of The Beauty and Joy of Computing at UC Berkeley have designed implemented a new feature that allows users to share code through script pics!! This feature has opened the doors to starter code libraries, sprite transport, and even autograding! We are excited to share our work!

12:20 pm - 12:40 pm PST
Room 3

Gordon Stein

Last Snap!con, we demonstrated an in-development version of a tool for students to use simulated robots in NetsBlox. This year, we have a new version, already being used in classrooms. You can control virtual robots with block-based code, in a 3D world, entirely in your browser. To go along with NetsBlox’s other collaboration tools, the environments are networked, allowing students working a...
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12:40 pm - 1:00 pm PST
Room 1

Andrea Mayr-Stalder, Michael Aschauer

Turtlestitch (TS) is a free platform, based on Snap!, enabling users to generate patterns for embroidery machines. It is easy to use, requiring no prior knowledge in programming, yet powerful in creating novel patterns for embroidery. It is widely used as a tool for innovative workshops, within and outside formal educational institutions, combining an introduction to programming with a hapti...
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12:40 pm - 1:00 pm PST
Room 2

Harley Lara, Ilgar Rasulov, Rolf Becker, Ali Farzizada

Snap! and AI

The talk will follow the process of classifying an image based on Snap! programming, sending it to the Jetson nano to analyze the image and reading it back to Snap for display and interaction, by tracking objects and following objects.

Snap! is used to take vi...
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12:40 pm - 1:00 pm PST
Room 3

Brendan Henrique

In the past year, I have had the unique experience of teaching students (and teachers) Snap!. As a graduate student instructor for the Beauty and Joy of Computing I taught college students, as a lead instructor for the BJC pre-college academy I taught high school students and as...
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10:45 am - 11:05 am PST
Room 1

Eckart Modrow

In a video is shown how to use some of the SciSnap! libraries in different projects. Examples include accessing SQL databases, searching a family-tree, image or sound compression with Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), machine learning techniques such as ID3, k-means, DBSCAN and outlier detection, and q-learning, as well as some of Stephen Wolfram's cellular automata.

10:45 am - 11:05 am PST
Room 2

Ogechi Shadamoro

Why is a longer format necessary?: The need for an additional time is to discuss he idea behind the creations and the story line it projects. Also to showcase the design thinking technique of a 9 year old child in creating designs with the snap platform and block codes.

If necessary, would you be willing to present this topic as a lightning talk?: Y...
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11:05 am - 11:25 am PST
Room 1

Brian Broll

Many existing approaches to bringing machine learning to blocks-based programming environments rely on embedded JavaScript or external APIs for the underlying model. As a result, some of the central aspects of the training or inference process are opaque to the user and limits the how deeply the process can be probed and understood.

In this talk, we present our recent work where we ...
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11:05 am - 11:25 am PST
Room 2

Bob Kahn

The purpose of this project was to show 7th and 8th grade students how to program an interactive Conjugation Machine for regular Spanish verbs. Students had varying degrees of programming experience from none to a lot. The project involved creating a microworld (the truly new awesome feature of Snap! 7.0) so that students only had the blocks needed to create the machine. Programming concepts...
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11:25 am - 11:45 am PST
Room 1

Isaac Merritt

The Data Science In Snap! (DASIS) library allows students without prior programming experience to learn and explore Data Science Principles. The DASIS library brings new functionality to Snap! with support for data tables and visualization. DASIS is featured in a new series of online modules located at https://cs10.org/bjc-r/course/b...
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11:25 am - 11:45 am PST
Room 2

Jordi Binefa

As a teacher of vocational training and master postgraduate, and engineer, I have developed a couple of OSHW boards (S4A PLB and IoT-02 board). S4a PLB is for teaching basic programming (using snap4arduino) and IoT-02 is for teaching IoT and Industry ...
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12:00 pm - 12:20 pm PST
Room 2

Bambi Brewer

Block-based languages have been used in education to enable beginners to focus on the ideas and logic of computer science without having to focus on syntax. These advantages hold for beginners of all ages, but the common narrative emphasizes the use of block-based languages for younger grades with the idea that students “graduate” to text-based programming languages after having some experie...
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12:20 pm - 12:40 pm PST
Room 2

Anthony Gordon

The NFS funded ExCITE project is adding robotics and computer control activities to the popular Beauty and Joy of Computing (BJC) AP-CSP curriculum. BJC uses the Snap! language. https://tinyurl.com/bdejtmf9

Steve Holmes (the developer of the BirdBrain Technologies Hummingbird proprietary micro:bit connector software interface and block libr...
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12:40 pm - 1:00 pm PST
Room 2
UC Berkeley